Track 11: Automation, Digital Lab, and Robotics

Platforms and Technologies for Digital Transformation of Lab Workflows

May 4 - 5, 2022 ALL TIMES EDT

The Automation, Digital Lab, and Robotics track will explore software, platforms and technologies that enable the creation of true digital lab workflows to increase automation, accelerate cycles, and provide accurate data to enable scientific decisions. Speakers will present case study examples and best practice solutions for seamlessly integrating devices and other applications along with challenges presented on how to catalyze the digital transformation of biopharma research.

Tuesday, May 3

7:00 am Registration Open (Plaza Level Lobby)
8:00 am Recommended Pre-Conference Workshops and Symposium*

On Tuesday, May 3, 2022 Cambridge Healthtech Institute is pleased to offer nine pre-conference workshops scheduled across three time slots (8:00-10:00 am, 10:30 am-12:30 pm, and 1:45-3:45 pm) and a Symposium from 8:25 am-3:45 pm. All are designed to be instructional, interactive and provide in-depth information on a specific topic. They allow for one-on-one interaction and provide a great way to explain more technical aspects that would otherwise not be covered during the main conference tracks that take place Wednesday-Thursday.

*Separate registration required. See Workshop page and Symposium page for details.

3:45 pm Session Break and Transition to Plenary Keynote

PLENARY KEYNOTE LOCATION: 210 (Overflow 208)

PLENARY KEYNOTE PROGRAM

4:00 pm

Welcome by Conference Organizer

Allison Proffitt, Editorial Director, Bio-IT World
4:05 pm Innovative Practices Award
Mike Tarselli, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer, TetraScience
4:30 pm

Ask What IT Can Do for Bio...and What Bio Can Do for IT

George M. Church, PhD, Robert Winthrop Professor, Genetics, Harvard Medical School

IT for Bio: In May 2021, one haploid human genome (3.055 billion bp) was sequenced completely, but zero diploid. We have 7.7 billion diploid humans yet to be sequenced and correlated with their environments and traits in the Personal Genome Project. Plus, at least one genome from each of over 8.7 million eukaryotic species in the Earth Biogenome project. Plus, monitoring pathogenic and commensal bacteria, allergens, and viruses in the BioWeatherMap. Plus, ancient DNA. We are counting RNA molecules per cell in most (or all) cell types in humans, mice, and many other species throughout development and connectome (with imaging resolution up to 20 nm).   

Bio for IT: Reading and writing DNA has improved exponentially in cost (at least 60 million fold) and is increasingly used for storing non-biological data. The record for editing DNA in vivo is now 24,000 edits per cell and for storing data in vivo is about 1 terabyte per mouse. Enormous chemical and biological 'libraries' can perform 'Natural Computing' for tasks far beyond current von-Neumann silicon and quantum computers. The combination of these – machine learning + megalibraries (ML-ML) is already having commercial impact (e.g. Nabla, Manifold, Dyno, Patch). 

5:45 pm Welcome Reception in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing (Auditorium/Hall C)
7:00 pm Close of Day

Wednesday, May 4

7:00 am Registration Open and Morning Coffee (Plaza Level Lobby)

PLENARY KEYNOTE ROOM LOCATION: 210

PLENARY KEYNOTE PROGRAM

8:00 am

Welcome by Conference Organizer

Allison Proffitt, Editorial Director, Bio-IT World
Zachary Powers, Chief Information Security Officer, Benchling
8:15 am

Accessing and Securing the Data that Drives Breakthroughs

Allison Proffitt, Editorial Director, Bio-IT World
Rachana Ananthakrishnan, Executive Director, Globus, University of Chicago
Ari E. Berman, PhD, CEO, BioTeam, Inc.
Jonathan C. Silverstein, Chief Research Informatics Officer & Professor, Biomedical Informatics, University of Pittsburgh
Rebecca F. Rosen, PhD, Director, Office of Data Science and Sharing, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health

Life sciences research is generating massive amounts of data that should be accessible to collaborators and colleagues to enable breakthrough discoveries. However, ensuring sensitive data are shared securely in a manner that protects patient privacy and complies with myriad regulations is a daunting task, which often slows the pace of research. Our panel of leading practitioners will share insights on the challenges and best practices of managing protected research data.

9:30 am Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing (Auditorium/Hall C)

ROOM LOCATION: 204

AUTOMATION AND DIGITALIZATION OF SCIENTIFIC AND ANALYTICAL DATA MANAGEMENT

10:15 am Organizer's Remarks
10:20 am

Chairperson's Remarks

Jeffrey Rosenfeld, PhD, Manager, Biomedical Informatics Shared Resource and Assistant Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey; President, Rosenfeld Consulting LLC
10:25 am

Increase Operational Efficiency in Pharma R&D with Lab Data Automation at Scale

Andreas Steinbacher, PhD, Lead Discovery Informatics Data Management, Roche pRED Informatics

Early research and development units in the Pharmaceutical industry have scaled their throughput by creating or leveraging several specialized units or laboratories (including external partners or CROs) that each deal with a particular step in the drug discovery process. This in turn creates the need for advanced planning and tracking of those activities, i.e., by capturing operational data, from idea to result. Due to the increasing level of automation in the specialized laboratories, a robust yet flexible information flow between different units is essential to leverage the potential of lab data automation. This talk will introduce a ‘Scientific Operational Data management platform’ for the life science research space and demonstrate how it can digitally augment the innovation process by enabling just-in-time operations and supporting data-driven decision-making.

10:55 am

An Automated Parameter Map -- From Data Generation and Curation to Visualization

Jordan Stobaugh, CMC Scientific Architecture Lead, AbbVie, Inc.

Development Sciences at AbbVie has embarked upon a digital transformation. A use-case driven approach, focusing on the key scientific challenges that can be addressed through improvements to the data landscape has been taken to drive this transformational effort. One of the initial use cases driven to completion resulted in the automated creation of a parameter map for impurities determined by HPLC analysis in drug substance development. Through the definition of a future state and leveraging three existing platforms in use by scientists at AbbVie, the team created an automated workflow combining data from automated lab reactors and offline chromatograms. Review of the data was completed in a curation platform prior to publishing of this information to a data warehouse for web-based visualization.

11:25 am

Digital Transformation of Laboratories: How a 5-Tier Approach and the iHEX System Can Make a Successful Laboratory of the Future

Felix Lenk,PhD, Grouphead SmartLab Systems, Institute of Natural Materials Technology, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany

The iHEX system bridges the gap between conventional chemical and biological laboratories which are static and usually only one setup matches one work process. iHEX adapts to a wide variety of work processes found in both worlds that can be executed on the installed devices. This maintains full efficiency because of the flexible layout. The innovative hexagon design of the tables enables a new way to form your lab. Changes in lab architecture can be done simply by attaching hexagonal static and mobile iHEX elements with the relevant device to form a new working process – iHEX takes care of the workflow process management. iHEX is an interface between the users, devices, control software and the infrastructure itself while it provides for the physical connection between iHEX elements and devices on top, inside or even function integrated combined with the necessary software infrastructure.

Ángel Gil Nolskog, Sales Consultant (Global Life Sciences), LabTwin GmbH

LabTwin is creating the next generation of digital lab tools for the lab space, starting with the world's first voice-activated lab assistant. With LabTwin, scientists can collect data, access information, manage experiments and streamline documentation simply by speaking. Using voice recognition and machine learning technology, LabTwin’s smart assistant simplifies data capture, structures valuable information, and integrates with lab instruments and informatic systems.

12:25 pm

Intuitive Solutions to Increase Automation, Throughput, and Accuracy in Automated Compound Synthesis

Derrick Miyao

With rapid advancement in automation across all industries, the pharmaceutical industry has been challenged to scale appropriately with the incorporation of AI to help discover new treatments for unmet medical needs. While automation itself has a strong place in the pharmaceutical industry, there is very little software that supports the complexity that each company requires. The Neurocrine solution is intuitive, user friendly, and accurate. Software simplifies the steps required to control robotics, integrate instrumentation, increase automation, accelerate cycles, and provide accurate data to enable scientific decisions.

12:55 pm Session Break and Transition to Luncheon Presentation
Julie Pacheco, VP of Service, Integrant

No matter where you are in the automation and integration process for your lab, learn more about the essential questions you need to answer when preparing to make decisions on investing in software, hardware, data, and AI solutions. Automated and integrated laboratory solutions should be intuitive, easy-to-use, and fit your specific environment, processes, and equipment. This, with AI, will give your company the flexibility to grow and scale for the future.

1:50 pm Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing (Auditorium/Hall C)

STANDARDIZATION IN LAB AUTOMATION

2:40 pm

SiLA & AnIML: Communication and Data Standards for the Lab of the Future

Burkhard Schaefer, Director, Head of Partnering, SiLA Consortium
3:10 pm

Digital Transformation of the Lab through Upcoming LADS OPC-UA Companion Specification

Dr. Matthias Arnold, Technical Lead LADS OPC-UA Joint Workgroup, CEO, AixEngineers
3:40 pm

Achieving Data Interoperability: Allotrope Foundation Updates

Corey E Bakalarski, PhD, Principal Bioinformatics Scientist, Computational Proteomics and Analytical Data Science Group, Genentech, Inc.
Kirsten Gesenberg, BIOVIA, Research & Development Portfolio Management Director, ELN at Dassault Systèmes, BIOVIA

The process of developing new therapeutics is costly and time-consuming, and generates considerable amounts of data from all of the associated lab experimental test results. A key goal of digital transformation is to better leverage this data, guiding scientists in their research through AI and machine learning. BIOVIA latest informatics solutions utilize a knowledge graph-based data model for experimental data, which enables scientists to gain unique insights based on existing work. We will discuss examples such as HPLC column selection and targeted querying for novel substances, and show how this technology has wide applicability across the lab. Now instead of using generic starting points, scientists can let the data do the work, guiding new research while increasing efficiency and productivity.

4:40 pm Best of Show Awards Reception in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing (Auditorium/Hall C)
6:00 pm Close of Day

Thursday, May 5

7:30 am Registration Open and Morning Coffee (Plaza Level Lobby)

PLENARY KEYNOTE ROOM LOCATION: 210

PLENARY KEYNOTE PROGRAM

8:00 am

Welcome by Conference Organizer

Allison Proffitt, Editorial Director, Bio-IT World
Nate Raine, Director Data Custodians, Lifebit
8:15 am

Leveraging Large-Scale Human Data to Advance and Accelerate Drug Discovery

Shankar Subramaniam, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Bioengineering; Professor of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Nanotechnology; Adjunct Professor of Cellular & Molecular Medicine, University of California at San Diego

Advances in genomics technologies have led to generation of massive amounts of human data. This has catalyzed new insights into cellular processes in the normal and disease state and facilitated the search for safe and effective medicines. The UK Biobank, All of US and TopMed initiatives are exemplars of this approach. We highlight examples from our lab where meaningful insights have been obtained advancing our understanding of disease biology and its pharmacological application.

9:30 am Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing (Auditorium/Hall C)

ROOM LOCATION: 204

LABORATORY WORKFLOW STRATEGIES

10:15 am Organizer's Remarks
10:25 am

Collaborative Robotics and Connectivity – Ingredients for Efficient Lab Automation

Andreas Traube, PhD, Department Director, Laboratory Automation and Biomanufacturing Engineering, Fraunhofer IPA
10:55 am

AutoLab: A Platform for Digital Transformation of Laboratory Workflows

Pedro Ivo Guimaraes, PhD, Scientist and Product Manager, Roche

The “The Lab Of The Future” is a place where scientists can step around the mundane aspects associated with having a lab—that is, planning, performing maintenance, scheduling, and preparing—and get straight to the process of experimentation. This requires that all of the aspects of a lab, from automated devices to research informatics tools are seamlessly integrated and streamlined, to increase efficiency and speed to generate new research insights. In this talk, I will introduce you to a digital lab automation platform called AutoLab, that we have developed at Roche and that is truly transforming the way our scientists design, share and execute lab workflows, getting us closer to the Lab Of The Future dream. I will present the concepts behind the platform, how it is solving common lab automation problems and how an open and collaborative design has democratized access to digital capabilities in our research laboratories.

11:25 am

Advances in Laboratory Automation: The Brigham and Women’s Hospital Experience

Milenko Jovan Tanasijevic, Vice Chair Clinical Pathology & Quality & Dir, Clinical Labs, Brigham & Womens Hospital

We report on advances achieved by the introduction of next-generation laboratory automation systems in our core chemistry and hematology laboratories including faster turnaround time, improved patient safety through positive identification, and streamlined process flow. We also describe the implementation process using existing laboratory space and we discuss IT challenges. 

11:55 am

Cryo-EM Digitization – Lab to Cloud 


Srinivasan Sadanandhamurthy, Director IT Digital and Data Engineering, Information Systems & Technology, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals
Abdul H. Shaik, Head of Data Science & Analytics Engineering, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Christian Buhay, Head, Computational Engineering, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals

The increasing advancements and utility of Cryo-electron Microscopy – the flash-freezing and fixing of protein particles a thin film of vitreous water— has given scientists the ability to visualize at unprecedented resolutions. Please join Regeneron’s digital leaders and the Structural Biology team to talk about how Regeneron embarked on the journey to bring Cryo-EM in-house. 

ROBOTIC PROCESS AUTOMATION APPLICATIONS AND USE CASES

12:25 pm

These are the Drones You’re Looking For: Advances in Robotics as Enablers to Digitalization in the Laboratory

Patrick Courtney, PhD, Analytical Lab Robotics Leader, euRobotics; Director, SiLA Consortium
12:55 pm Session Break and Transition to Luncheon Presentation
1:05 pm Luncheon Presentation (Sponsorship Opportunity Available) or Enjoy Lunch on Your Own
1:50 pm Refreshment Break in the Exhibit Hall with Poster Viewing (Auditorium/Hall C)
2:40 pm

Building High Performing Digital Teams

Anamika Sarkar, PhD, Intelligent Automation Lead, Global Dev Solutions, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
3:10 pm

Smelling Your Way to Digital Health: Digital Nose for Hyperautomation

Vinod Das, Associate Director, Pharma, Bayer Pharmaceuticals
Satish V. Kamath, Science Fellow, Senior Associate Director, Bayer Consumer Health
  • Machine olfaction is an automated stimulation technology for smellable devices with a projected market value of $34.2 billion by 2027
  • What if your smellable device could detect drug potency and make therapeutic recommendations? 
  • We will demonstrate how a digitally-trained nose can distinguish numerous types of aromas in this experimental journey. 
  • The Human-In-The-Loop (HITL) architecture of automation is employed to increase the confidence ratings. 
  • A self-built use case presentation with references to the underlying platform and future replications, as well as the current state of the Internet of Senses (IoS) market, would be the key takeaways for our audience.


3:40 pm

Learnings from a Chemistry ELN Migration

Raquel Dias Miranda Hoggett, Service Manager, Small Molecule Discovery Workflows, Roche Pharma

In 2020 I created 2 babies, a flesh one and an electronic one, and only now with some distance do I realize how much they have in common. I would like to share our experience with this particular data and system migration, what went well and improved and the lessons learned with this project.

4:10 pm Close of Conference
4:00 pm

Welcome by Conference Organizer

Allison Proffitt, Editorial Director, Bio-IT World





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