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Tuesday, April 29 | 4:00 – 5:00 PM

Keynote Introduction: 

Dave Wilson, Senior Director, Business Development Manager, Global Channels, Hitachi Data Systems

   

John QuackenbushCreating an Information Ecosystem for Personalized Genomic Medicine  

John Quackenbush, Ph.D.
CEO, GenoSpace; Professor, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard School of Public Health
 


John Quackenbush received his Ph.D. in 1990 in theoretical physics from UCLA working on string theory models. Following two years as a postdoctoral fellow in physics, Dr. Quackenbush applied for and received a Special Emphasis Research Career Award from the National Center for Human Genome Research to work on the Human Genome Project. He spent two years at the Salk Institute and two years at Stanford University working at the interface of genomics and computational biology. In 1997 he joined the faculty of The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR) where his focus began to shift to understanding what was encoded within the human genome. Since joining the faculties of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Harvard School of Public Health in 2005, his work has focused on decoding and modeling the networks of interacting genes that drive disease. In 2011 he and partner Mick Correll launched GenoSpace to facilitate genomic data analysis and interpretation, focused on accelerating research and delivering relevant and actionable solutions for personalized medicine.


Wednesday, April 30 | 8:00 – 9:45 AM

Keynote Introduction: 

Sanjay Joshi, CTO, Life Sciences, EMC Isilon

 

 

Stephen FriendNextGen Research: Enabling Distributed Teams of Experts and the Engaged Public to Solve Complex Biomedical Problems  

Stephen H. Friend, M.D., Ph.D.
President, Co-Founder and Director of Sage Bionetworks
 


Dr. Friend is the President of Sage Bionetworks. He was previously Senior Vice President and Franchise Head for Oncology Research at Merck & Co., Inc. where he led Merck’s Basic Cancer Research efforts. He led the Advanced Technologies and Oncology groups to firmly establish molecular profiling activities throughout Merck’s laboratories around the world, as well as to coordinate oncology programs from Basic Research through phase IIA clinical trials. Prior to joining Merck, Dr. Friend along with Dr. Leland Hartwell founded and co-led the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center’s “Seattle Project”, an advanced institute for drug discovery. While there Drs. Friend and Hartwell developed a method for examining large patterns of genes that led them to co-found Rosetta Inpharmatics in 1997. Dr. Friend has also held faculty positions at Harvard Medical School from 1987 to 1995 and at Massachusetts General Hospital from 1990 to 1995. He received his B.A. in philosophy, his Ph.D. in chemistry and his M.D. from Indiana University. Dr. Friend was named an Ashoka Fellow for his work at Sage Bionetworks.

Benjamin Franklin Award Presentation and Best Practices Awards Program follows
 
2014 Benjamin Franklin Award Laureate: 
Helen Berman, Ph.D., Board of Governors Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University; Founding Member, Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB); Director, Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics PDB (RCSB PDB)

Thursday, May 1 | 8:00 – 10:00 AM

Keynote Introduction: 

Fred Lee, M.D., MPH, Director, Healthcare Strategy and Business Development, Oracle Health Sciences

  

Yaniv ErlichCrowd Genomics 

Yaniv Erlich, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator and Whitehead Fellow, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research
 


Dr. Yaniv Erlich is Andria and Paul Heafy Family Fellow and Principal Investigator at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. He received a bachelor’s degree from Tel-Aviv University, Israel and a PhD from the Watson School of Biological Sciences at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in 2010. Dr. Erlich’s research interests are computational human genetics. Dr. Erlich is the recipient of the Burroughs Wellcome Career Award (2013), Harold M. Weintraub award (2010), the IEEE/ACM-CS HPC award (2008), and he was selected as one of 2010 Tomorrow’s PIs team of Genome Technology.

   

Heather Dewey-HagborgAnonymity in the Genomic Age  

Heather Dewey-Hagborg
Artist, Ph.D. Student, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
 


Heather Dewey-Hagborg is an interdisciplinary artist, programmer and educator who explores art as research and public inquiry. She recreates identity from strands of human hair in an entirely different way. Collecting hairs she finds in random public places – bathrooms, libraries, and subway seats – she uses a battery of newly developing technologies to create physical, life-sized portraits of the owners of these hairs. Her fixation with a single hair leads her to controversial art projects and the study of genetics. Traversing media ranging from algorithms to DNA, her work seeks to question fundamental assumptions underpinning perceptions of human nature, technology and the environment. Examining culture through the lens of information, Heather creates situations and objects embodying concepts, probes for reflection and discussion. Her work has been featured in print, television, radio, and online. Heather has a BA in Information Arts from Bennington College and a Masters degree from the Interactive Telecommunications Program at Tisch School of the Arts, New York University. She is currently a Ph.D. student in Electronic Arts at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Information Altruism versus Genomic Disinformation and the Premature Eulogies for Privacy IsaacKohane 

Isaac Samuel Kohane, M.D., Ph.D.  

Henderson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology, Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School; Director, Countway Library of Medicine; Director, i2b2 National Center for Biomedical Computing; Co-Director, HMS Center for Biomedical Informatics  

 Isaac Kohane, MD, PhD, co-directs the Center for Biomedical Informatics at Harvard Medical School. He applies computational techniques, whole genome analysis, and functional genomics to study human diseases through the developmental lens, and particularly through the use of animal model systems. Kohane has led the use of whole healthcare systems, notably in the i2b2 project, as “living laboratories” to drive discovery research in disease genomics (with a focus on autism) and pharmacovigilance (including providing evidence for the cardiovascular risk of hypoglycemic agents which ultimately contributed to “black box”ing by the FDA) and comparative effectiveness with software and methods adopted in over 84 academic health centers internationally. Dr. Kohane has published over 200 papers in the medical literature and authored a widely used book on Microarrays for an Integrative Genomics. He has been elected to multiple honor societies including the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the American College of Medical Informatics, and the Institute of Medicine. He leads a doctoral program in genomics and bioinformatics within the Division of Medical Science at Harvard University. He is also an occasionally practicing pediatric endocrinologist. 



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